Hancock Chamber of Commerce http://www.hancockchamber.org Thu, 11 Feb 2016 18:31:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 James Fallows on Eleven Signs a City Will Succeed The Atlantic http://www.hancockchamber.org/james-fallows-on-eleven-signs-a-city-will-succeed-the-atlantic/ Thu, 11 Feb 2016 16:29:26 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5389 How does the cities in Hancock County measure up? Go through the article Eleven Signs A City Will Succeed in The Atlantic, written by James Fallows, to se if your city makes the cut. We definitely are proud to have number 11 in the county.

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James Fallows
March 2016 Issue | U.S.

PDF of Article

This article appears in the March print edition alongside the cover story, “Can America Put Itself Back Together?”—a summation of James and Deb Fallows’s 54,000-mile journey around America in a single-engine plane. More dispatches from their ongoing reporting trip can be found here.

BY THE TIME we had been to half a dozen cities, we had developed an informal checklist of the traits that distinguished a place where things seemed to work. These items are obviously different in nature, most of them are subjective, and some of them overlap. But if you tell us how a town measures up based on these standards, we can guess a lot of other things about it. In our experiences, these things were true of the cities, large or small, that were working best:

1. Divisive national politics seem a distant concern.

We first traveled during the run-up to the bitter midterm elections of 2014, then while the Supreme Court was ruling on same-sex marriage and Obamacare, and then as the 2016 presidential campaign was gathering steam. Given the places we were visiting, I imagine that many of the people we interviewed were Donald Trump supporters.

But the presidential race just didn’t come up. Cable TV was often playing in the background, most frequently Fox News; if people had stopped to talk about what was on, they might have disagreed with one another and with us. But overwhelmingly the focus in successful towns was not on national divisions but on practical problems that a community could address. The more often national politics came into local discussions, the worse shape the town was in.

2. You can pick out the local patriots.

A standard question we’d ask soon after arrival was “Who makes this town go?” The answers varied widely. Sometimes it was a mayor or a city-council member. Sometimes it was a local business titan or real-estate developer. Sometimes a university president or professor, a civic activist, an artist, a saloon-keeper, a historian, or a radio personality. In one city in West Virginia, we asked a newspaper editor this question, and the answer turned out to be a folk musician who was also a civic organizer. What mattered was that the question had an answer. And the more quickly it was provided, the better shape the town was in.

3. “Public-private partnerships” are real.

Through the years I had assumed this term was just another slogan, or a euphemism for sweetheart deals between Big Government and Big Business.

But in successful towns, people can point to something specific and say, This is what a partnership means. In Greenville, South Carolina, the public-school system includes an elementary school for engineering in a poor neighborhood. The city runs the school; local companies like GE send in engineers to teach and supervise science fairs, at their own expense. In Holland, Michigan, the family-owned Padnos scrap-recycling company works with a local ministry called 70×7 Life Recovery to hire ex-prisoners who would otherwise have trouble reentering the workforce. In Fresno, California, a collaboration among the city, county, and state governments; local universities; and several tech start ups trains high-school dropouts and other unemployed people in computer skills. The more specifically a community can explain what their public-private partnerships mean, the better off the city is.

4. People know the civic story.

America has a “story,” which everyone understands even if only to say it’s a myth or a lie. A few states have their guiding stories—California as either the ever-promising or the sadly spoiled frontier, Vermont as its own separate Eden.

Successful cities have their stories too. For Sioux Falls, South Dakota, that it’s just the right size: big enough so that people who have come from the smaller-town prairie can find challenge, stimulation, opportunity; small enough to be livable and comfortable. For Columbus, Ohio, which is several times larger than Sioux Falls, that it’s big enough to make anything possible; small enough to actually get things done. For Bend, Oregon; or Duluth, Minnesota; or Winters, California, that they are in uniquely attractive locations. For Pittsburgh, that it has set an example of successful turnaround. For Eastport, Maine, or Allentown or Fresno or Detroit, that they are in the process of turning around. As with guiding national myths, the question is not whether these assessments seem precisely accurate to outsiders. Their value is in giving citizens a sense of how today’s efforts are connected to what happened yesterday and what they hope for tomorrow.

5. They have a downtown.

This seems obvious, but it is probably the quickest single marker of the condition of a town. For a “young” country like the United States, surprisingly many cities still have “good bones,” the classic Main Street–style structures built from the late 1800s through World War II. In the mall-and-freeway decades after the war, some of these buildings were razed and many more were abandoned or disfigured with cheap aluminum fronts.

Most of the cities we visited were pouring attention, resources, and creativity into their downtown. The Main Street America project, from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, has coordinated downtown-revival projects in some 2,000 communities. Of the downtowns we saw, Greenville’s and Burlington’s were the most advanced, studied by planners around the world. But downtown ambitions of any sort are a positive sign, and second- and third-floor apartments and condos over restaurants and stores with lights on at night suggest that the downtown has crossed a decisive threshold and will survive.

6. They are near a research university.

Research universities have become the modern counterparts to a natural harbor or a river confluence. In the short term, they lift the economy by bringing in a student population. Over James Fallows on Eleven Signs a City Will Succeed The Atlantic the longer term, they transform a town through the researchers and professors they attract: When you find a Chinese or German physicist in the Dakotas, or a Yale literature Ph.D. in California’s Central Valley, that person probably works for a university. Research universities have become powerful start-up incubators. For instance: Clemson and the array of automotive-tech firms that have grown up around it in South Carolina, or UC Davis and associated agro-tech ventures. Riverside and San Bernardino were similar-size cities with similar economic prospects at the end of World War II. Their paths have diverged, in part because in the 1950s Riverside was chosen as the site of a new University of California campus.

7. They have, and care about, a community college.

Not every city can have a research university. Any ambitious one can have a community college.

Just about every world-historical trend is pushing the United States (and other countries) toward a less equal, more polarized existence: labor replacing technology, globalized trade, self-segregated residential-housing patterns, the American practice of unequal district-based funding for public schools. Community colleges are the main exception, potentially offering a connection to high-wage technical jobs for people who might otherwise be left with no job or one at minimum wage. East Mississippi Community College has taken people who were jobless or on welfare and prepared them for work in nearby factories that pay much more than the local median household income (for instance, some $80,000 in the steel factory, versus a local median income of about $35,000). Fresno City College works with local tech firms and the city’s Cal State campus to train the children of farm workers (among others) for high-tech agribusiness jobs.

Obviously, this does not end inequality, and badly run community colleges can make things worse by loading students with debt without improving their circumstances. Nationwide, only about 40 percent of those who start at a public community college finish within six years. But we saw a number of schools that were clearly forces in the right direction. The more often and more specifically we heard people talk about their community college, the better we ended up feeling about the direction of that town.

8. They have unusual schools.

Early in our stay, we would ask what was the most distinctive school to visit at the K–12 level. If four or five answers came quickly to mind, that was a good sign.

The examples people suggested ranged widely. Some were “normal” public schools. Some were charters. Some emphasized career and technical training, like Camden County High School, in Georgia. Some were statewide public boarding schools, like the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, and the Mississippi School for Mathematics and Sciences. Some were religious or private schools. The common theme was intensity of experimentation.

9. They make themselves open.

The anti-immigrant passion that has inflamed this election cycle was not something people expressed in most of the cities we visited. On the contrary. Politicians, educators, businesspeople, students, and retirees frequently stressed the ways their communities were trying to attract and include new people. Cities as different as Sioux Falls, Burlington, and Fresno have gone to extraordinary lengths to assimilate refugees from recent wars. The mayor of Greenville, South Carolina, asked us to listen for how many different languages we heard spoken on the street by business visitors.

Every small town in America has thought about how to offset the natural brain drain that has historically sent its brightest young people elsewhere. The same emphasis on inclusion that makes a town attractive to talented outsiders increases its draw to its own natives.

10. They have big plans.

If I see a national politician with a blueprint for how things will be better 20 years from now, I think: “Good luck!” In fact, few national politicians even pretend to offer a long-term vision anymore. When a mayor or city-council member shows me a map of how new downtown residences will look when completed, or where the new greenway will go, I think: “I’d like to come back.” Cities still make plans, because they can do things.

✅ 11. They have craft breweries. ✭ ✭ ✭ ✭ ✭

One final marker, perhaps the most reliable: A city on the way back will have one or more craft breweries, and probably some small distilleries too. Until 2012, that would have been an unfair test for Mississippi, which effectively outlawed craft beers by setting maximum alcohol levels at 5 percent. Now that law has changed, and Mississippi has 10 craft breweries. Once-restrictive Utah has even more. A town that has craft breweries also has a certain kind of entrepreneur, and a critical mass of mainly young (except for me) customers. You may think I’m joking, but just try to find an exception.

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Hancock High Junior is the Mississippi Finalist in Google’s Doodle 4 National Competition http://www.hancockchamber.org/hancock-high-junior-is-the-mississippi-finalist-in-googles-doodle-4-national-competition/ Fri, 05 Feb 2016 23:21:05 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5384 Marie Konapacki was recognized Friday with a visit by U. S. Senator Roger Wicker. Wicker helped unveil Marie’s artwork during a School Assembly at Hancock High School. Senator Wicker is a member of the Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee and … Read more

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Hancock High Junior is the Mississippi Finalist in Google’s Doodle 4 National CompetitionMarie Konapacki was recognized Friday with a visit by U. S. Senator Roger Wicker. Wicker helped unveil Marie’s artwork during a School Assembly at Hancock High School. Senator Wicker is a member of the Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee and also serves as chairman of the Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet.

52 other state and territory winners will compete and the public can vote on line through February 22nd for their favorite doodle by visiting Doodle 4 http://www.google.com/doodle4google/vote.html.

On March 21, the national winner will be announced and their doodle goes live on google.com.   Doodle 4 Google is a competition open to all K-12 students in the U.S. for the chance to have it featured on the Google homepage. This year the theme is: “What makes me…me.”?

There are a million and one facts, interests, and quirks that make everyone unique. For centuries, artists have created paintings, sculptures, self-portraits, and more to offer insights into their personalities and values. Konapacki’s doodle shows the world what she is passionate about.

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Senator Wicker visits Hancock County to Recognize Area Teachers http://www.hancockchamber.org/senator-wicker-visits-hancock-county-to-recognize-area-teachers/ Fri, 05 Feb 2016 23:02:03 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5378 U. S. Senator Roger Wicker met with Hancock County School Superintendent Alan Dedeaux and Mississippi State Senator Philip Moran today to recognize the School District’s Teachers of the Year during a luncheon at the Hancock County Career-Technical School.  Students from … Read more

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U. S. Senator Roger Wicker met with Hancock County School Superintendent Alan Dedeaux and Mississippi State Senator Philip Moran today to recognize the School District’s Teachers of the Year during a luncheon at the Hancock County Career-Technical School.  Students from three area High Schools:  Hancock High, Bay High and Pass High were busy all week preparing a spectacular luncheon for the event.  This effort is part of the school’s culinary arts program.  Congratulations to the teachers who were recognized today.  Debbie Hester was recognized as Teacher of the Year for Hancock County and West Hancock Elementary.  Other teachers recognized include:   Jeremy Turcotte, Hancock High School;  Michael Gaudin, Hancock County Career-Tech;  Angelica Dawsey, Hancock Middle;  Cindy Ladner, East Hancock;  Rebecca Carver, Hancock North Central;  and, Debbie Johnson, South Hancock.  Dr. Stacey Lee was recognized as Administrator of the Year.  “This is the kind of school district that makes you proud,” said Senator Wicker.     

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10,000 Small Businesses Summer 2016 Program http://www.hancockchamber.org/10000-small-businesses-summer-2016-program/ Fri, 05 Feb 2016 22:07:27 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5369 Submit Your Application Today
The application deadline for the 10,000 Small Businesses Summer 2016 program at Delgado Community College is
March 4th!

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Submit Your Application Today
The application deadline for the 10,000 Small Businesses Summer 2016 program at Delgado Community College is
March 4th!

  • Learn from the experts. Take a practical hands-on business course and acquire useful business skills such as contract negotiation, finance, and people management.
  • Invest in yourself. Take advantage of this professional growth opportunity to develop your leadership skills.
  • Get customized business assistance. Receive one-on-one business advising and create your own customized business growth plan.
  • Make connections. Learn from the experiences of other small business owners in a collaborative setting.
  • Be poised for business growth. Business owners selected for the program will receive a scholarship, which covers all tuition and program materials.

Please visit our website at www.dcc.edu/10KSB or call 504-671-5555 for more information.

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Palazzo Named Co-Chairman of House Aerospace Caucus http://www.hancockchamber.org/palazzo-named-co-chairman-of-house-aerospace-caucus/ Thu, 04 Feb 2016 22:45:23 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5366 Washington, DC – Congressman Steven Palazzo (MS-4) released a statement today after being named Co-Chairman of the House Aerospace Caucus. “I’m honored to be selected for this opportunity to serve as the voice for the aerospace and defense industry in … Read more

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Washington, DC – Congressman Steven Palazzo (MS-4) released a statement today after being named Co-Chairman of the House Aerospace Caucus.

“I’m honored to be selected for this opportunity to serve as the voice for the aerospace and defense industry in Congress. As the Representative for South Mississippi, home of Stennis Space Center and Keesler Air Force Base, I’ve had the privilege of working alongside this industry in an effective partnership for many years. I understand the vital role this industry plays in our country’s economic stability, technological advancement and ability to compete globally, and most importantly our national security efforts.”

“Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) is delighted that Congressman Steven Palazzo has agreed to serve as one of the House Aerospace Caucus co-chairs,” said AIA President and CEO David F. Melcher. “He is an enthusiastic supporter of the aerospace and defense industry, and his service in the House on the Appropriations Committee and as part of the Majority Whip Team will be key to addressing the difficult issues facing our nation and our industry.”
The House Aerospace Caucus consists of more than 50 members of the U.S. House of Representatives. The aerospace industry touches almost every state in the country and is a leading contributor to the world’s safety and security, global travel, beyond earth exploration, and domestic economy in the United States. The aerospace industry in the United States employs more than one million workers across all 50 states. It is also the nation’s largest net exporter and one of the biggest contributors to the annual U.S. GDP.

 

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Day Trippin’ MS Gulf Coast Launches 2nd Episode http://www.hancockchamber.org/5374-2/ Thu, 04 Feb 2016 22:21:37 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5374 Mrs. Gulf Coast 2016 Jaimee Dorris and Play the Coast Magazine are excited to release Day Trippin’ Mississippi Gulf Coast Episode 2: “Mrs. Mardi Gras” music video on YouTube.

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Jaimee Dorris

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Bay Saint Louis, MS – Mrs. Gulf Coast 2016 Jaimee Dorris and Play the Coast Magazine are excited to release Day Trippin’ Mississippi Gulf Coast Episode 2: “Mrs. Mardi Gras” music video on YouTube.

“Mrs Mardi Gras” is a music parody video highlighting the exciting experience of attending a Gulf Coast Mardi Gras parade. The video was filmed during the Ocean Springs Elks Club Mardi Gras parade Jan 23rd.

“Everyone thinks New Orleans is the only place to enjoy Mardi Gras, but it’s just not true. The Mississippi Gulf Coast has a vibrant carnival celebration that is unique and still family friendly. We have our own traditions that make our Mardi Gras special, and we want to promote that,” says Dorris.

“Mrs. Mardi Gras” is part of a new music video series both Dorris and Play the Coast magazine are producing. The series is called “Day Trippin’ Mississippi Gulf Coast,” and aims to promote tourism by promoting day trips to South Mississippi through comedy and new media. In the videos, Dorris is the narrator/singer and her team of merry women can be found doing anything from playing cowgirls to wearing moustaches. Each video also features one local celebrity.

“Jaimee and her team are hilarious. They were doing funny videos on Facebook when I first saw them and got the idea,” says Arturo Barajas, Play the Coast magazine owner. “Instead of using pretty faces from other areas to promote our region in a generic way, we decided to try something different. We are using new media, local talent, and funny stories to show the world what is authentically South Mississippi!”

The “Mrs. Mardi Gras” video can be found at https://youtu.be/_nnR2fqTXfc or by visiting jaimeedorris.com and PlaytheCoast.com. Sponsorship opportunities are available.

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Little Theatre Auditions for “The Rose Tattoo” http://www.hancockchamber.org/little-theatre-auditions-for-the-rose-tattoo/ Fri, 29 Jan 2016 14:34:29 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5360 The Bay St. Louis Little Theatre has scheduled auditions for “The Rose Tattoo” by Tennessee Williams.  The Williams play is part of the Tennessee Williams event that includes the play and the annual “Stella Yelling Contest.”  Auditions will be held … Read more

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The Bay St. Louis Little Theatre has scheduled auditions for “The Rose Tattoo” by Tennessee Williams.  The Williams play is part of the Tennessee Williams event that includes the play and the annual “Stella Yelling Contest.”  Auditions will be held on Saturday, January 30 at 11am and Monday, February 1 at 6:30pm.  The Theatre is located at 398 Blaize Avenue in the Depot District.  The casting calls for 9 males and 14 females of all ages.   All are welcome to auditions.

“The Rose Tattoo” is one of the most famous plays by Tennessee Williams.  It debuted on Broadway in 1951 and won the 1951 Tony Award for Best Play.  It opened with Maureen Stapleton and Eli Wallach as the leads.  In 1955, the movie starred Burt Lancaster and Anna Magnani.  The setting is in Louisiana. 

Auditions will require readings from the “Rose Tattoo” playscript which will be provided at the audition.  Usually for every BSLLT show, there are cast members experiencing their first performance on stage.  Every show provides an opportunity to involve beginning actors with veteran actors.

“The Rose Tattoo” opens on April 1st.  For more information call 228-467-9024 0r 228-216-4906 or go to www.bsllt.org.

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WILLIAMS TAPPED AS PANELIST FOR INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT LEADERSHIP SUMMIT http://www.hancockchamber.org/williams-tapped-as-panelist-for-international-economic-development-leadership-summit/ Tue, 26 Jan 2016 22:48:15 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5356 Tish Williams was selected as the Mississippi economic development panelist for the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) Leadership Summit in New Orleans on Sunday, January 24th at the Sheraton Hotel. For the past 14 years, she has served as executive … Read more

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Pictured left to right are members of the International Economic Development Council Leadership and Resiliency Panel during the Leadership Summit in New Orleans: Mike Olivier, Louisiana Committee of 100; Brenda Bertus, St. Tammany Economic Development Foundation; Michael Hecht, Greater New Orleans, Inc.; Tish Williams, Hancock County Chamber of Commerce; Henry Caoxum Jr., Coaxum Enterprises; Barbara Johnson, The Johnson Group; and, Bob Johnson, Greater New Orleans Chamber of Commerce.

Pictured left to right are members of the International Economic Development Council Leadership and Resiliency Panel during the Leadership Summit in New Orleans: Mike Olivier, Louisiana Committee of 100; Brenda Bertus, St. Tammany Economic Development Foundation; Michael Hecht, Greater New Orleans, Inc.; Tish Williams, Hancock County Chamber of Commerce; Henry Caoxum Jr., Coaxum Enterprises; Barbara Johnson, The Johnson Group; and, Bob Johnson, Greater New Orleans Chamber of Commerce.

Tish Williams was selected as the Mississippi economic development panelist for the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) Leadership Summit in New Orleans on Sunday, January 24th at the Sheraton Hotel. For the past 14 years, she has served as executive director of the Hancock Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber has managed Partners for Stennis Space Center for the past 12 years and established the Hancock Community Development Foundation in 2006 as a funding conduit for economic and community development projects following Katrina.

During the Leadership Summit, she joined a distinguished panel of economic development executives who have been in the New Orleans area for more than a decade. Panelists shared lessons learned with over 400 senior-level economic developers in attendance. The focus was on bringing resiliency to local economies. It also explored the partnerships communities must develop, as well as the latest techniques to improve organizational performance and leaders’ roles in achieving economic growth. The summit was designed to illustrate what economic development organizations can achieve under visionary leadership.

“As a region, we have accomplished so much, and it was an honor to have had the opportunity to share what we’ve learned that can be applied to all communities, not just ones affected by natural disasters,” said Williams. Under her leadership, the organizations she leads have secured more than $11 million in state and federal grants for economic and community development projects for Hancock County. Williams has been a speaker and assessment team member of the IEDC for the past decade. “Working with IEDC gives our community a way to give back to those who came to help and gave us so much hope in the after math of multiple disasters.”

IEDC is the world’s largest organization of its kind serving economic developers who are promoting the economic well-being and quality of life for their communities by creating, retaining, and expanding jobs that facilitate growth, enhance wealth and provide a stable tax base.

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Katharine Truett Ohman is 2016 Jody Compretta Person of Passion http://www.hancockchamber.org/katharine-truett-ohman-is-2016-jody-compretta-person-of-passion/ Fri, 22 Jan 2016 23:19:36 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5342 During the Hancock Chamber 90th Annual meeting, Katharine Truett Ohman, co-chairman of the Hancock Chamber Beautification Committee, was recognized as the recipient of the 2016 Jody Compretta Person of Passion for her efforts throughout Hancock County, improving transportation corridors, water … Read more

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Pictured left to right are:  Tish Williams, executive director of the Hancock Chamber;  Katharine Truett Ohman, Co-chairman of the Hancock Chamber Beautification Committee and 2016 recipient of the Jody Compretta Person of Passion Award;  Cathy Wilson, Vice President of the Hancock Chamber Board;  Mark Henderson, Past President;  and, Angelyn Treutel-Zeringue, 2016 Chamber President.

Pictured left to right are: Tish Williams, executive director of the Hancock Chamber; Katharine Truett Ohman, Co-chairman of the Hancock Chamber Beautification Committee and 2016 recipient of the Jody Compretta Person of Passion Award; Cathy Wilson, Vice President of the Hancock Chamber Board; Mark Henderson, Past President; and, Angelyn Treutel-Zeringue, 2016 Chamber President.

During the Hancock Chamber 90th Annual meeting, Katharine Truett Ohman, co-chairman of the Hancock Chamber Beautification Committee, was recognized as the recipient of the 2016 Jody Compretta Person of Passion for her efforts throughout Hancock County, improving transportation corridors, water quality and beautification.

Long before Katharine Truett Ohman became the co-chair of the Hancock Chamber Beautification Committee, she was volunteering her time throughout the community to make Hancock County a better place to live. She has dedicated her life to improving quality of life for all of our citizens.

A master’s level therapist, with most of her experience working in the school system, she believes there are strong ties between a person’s mental health and their environment and this is why she has a passion for improving the environment throughout Hancock County. As co-chairman of the Hancock Chamber Beautification Committee, she has brought vast resources together to not only beautify the county but also implement conservational strategies to improve water quality. She credits Don Batson of Green Forest Nursery for his generous donations to make her work possible.

Working with Mayor Les Fillingame and Jimmy Loiacano in Bay St. Louis and Mayor Mike Smith and Don Sibenkittel in Waveland, she has spear-headed tree plantings along major corridors. With the help of many volunteers, a community garden has been established in Bay St. Louis that features a fruit orchard. The fruit and other items grown in the community garden are cultivated and harvested by volunteers who then share the bounty with the local senior citizens and Food Pantry.

The Hancock Chamber Person of Passion award features a piece of original art by the late Jody Compretta entitled “ROADS..for a wide door of opportunity for effective service has opened to me and there are many adversaries.”  Jody believed that for anything worth pursuing there would be obstacles along the road and with passion and persistence you will succeed as Katharine Truett Ohman has in beautification efforts she has led throughout the county.

The Hancock Chamber Person of Passion award features a piece of original art by the late Jody Compretta entitled “ROADS..for a wide door of opportunity for effective service has opened to me and there are many adversaries.” Jody believed that for anything worth pursuing there would be obstacles along the road and with passion and persistence you will succeed as Katharine Truett Ohman has in beautification efforts she has led throughout the county.

Conservational water ditches have also been established. “By planting these ditches with specialized plants like Louisiana Irises, the irises not only look lovely, but they also filter out pollutants from run-off keeping local estuaries and coastal waters cleaner,” said Ohman.

Katharine also raises funds through the Life Grows On Memorial Tree Planting program and then insures that trees are planted in targeted areas throughout the county in memory of loved ones. Volunteer groups have adopted roadways throughout the county; and, often, you will see her on major corridors doing her part to clean up unsightly trash through the Adopt-A-Highway program.

Under her leadership, the beautification committee has launched a public relations effort to catch citizens in the act of a beautiful deed, cleaning up the city on their own. Katharine, Sibenkittel and Tommy Kidd, co-chair of the Mississippi Coastal Clean-up, have provided leadership to organize the effort each year for Hancock County to clean up the marine environment. She has also led beautification efforts at Martin Luther King Park and conducted educational programs for school groups.

Recently her work was featured in the Fleur de Lis, a journal of the Society of Louisiana Irises, generating tremendous publicity for the area. Her work is never complete, planning her next project before the current project is even complete. One of her next projects is to complete a community garden mural. Already, she has 21 gallons of paint donated, and all she needs is a few willing volunteers to help get it done.

“Bring your own paint brush,” she said, “and let’s get going on the next project.”

“I invite anyone who wants to get involved to be a part of this effort,” said Katharine. “For as long as I am alive, I will continue to volunteer my time to make our county the most beautiful place on earth to live.”   To volunteer, email her at: ktolsu@hotmail.com. Or, call the Hancock Chamber at 228-467-9048.

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Compretta-passionTHE LATE JODY COMPRETTA WAS A PERSON OF PASSION
The late Jody Compretta was an entrepreneur, business leader and philanthropist who served as president of the Chamber of Commerce in 2002 and 2004, and was the inaugural chairman of the Hancock Community Development Foundation in 2006. He also served on the Hancock County Port & Harbor Commission and was president of the Bay St. Louis Rotary. He was one of the first to receive the Top 40 Business Leaders Under 40 Award by the Sun Herald. In 2003, the Chamber recognized him for his work as Citizen of the Year, the youngest person to receive this honor in Chamber history. After Katrina, Jody was part of the group of business leaders known as the Bay Area Recovery Team who met weekly to strategize on how to bring economic vibrancy back to the Bay and Hancock County. The marina inside the Bay St. Louis Harbor Development was recently named in his memory.

“If you knew Jody,” said Cathy Wilson, “you knew he lived by the mantra: always expect the best and never, never give up.” But the mantra that was truly his driving force behind everything he did was “Failure cannot cope with persistence.”   And, he proved this time and again through his passion for making Hancock County a better place to live. He would often say the reason he did what he did was for the future of Hancock County – most especially his children, Sofia and Nicholas. He believed that working together we could accomplish great things because none of us is as smart as all of us.



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Henderson passes gavel to Zeringue to lead the Hancock Chamber http://www.hancockchamber.org/henderson-passes-gavel-to-zeringue-to-lead-the-hancock-chamber-as-president-katharine-ohman-is-named-jody-compretta-person-of-passion/ Fri, 22 Jan 2016 23:10:26 +0000 http://www.hancockchamber.org/?p=5337 During the 90th Annual Membership Meeting of the Hancock Chamber of Commerce, members commemorated the founding of the Chamber by the Bay St. Louis Rotary Club in 1925 to a sell-out crowd at Diamondhead Country Club on January 22nd. Mark … Read more

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Mark Henderson of Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company, 2015 Hancock Chamber President, passes the gavel to Angelyn Treutel-Zeringue of SouthGroup Insurance-Gulf Coast who assumed the presidency of the Hancock Chamber during the 90th Annual Meeting at Diamondhead Country Club.

Mark Henderson of Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company, 2015 Hancock Chamber President, passes the gavel to Angelyn Treutel-Zeringue of SouthGroup Insurance-Gulf Coast who assumed the presidency of the Hancock Chamber during the 90th Annual Meeting at Diamondhead Country Club.

During the 90th Annual Membership Meeting of the Hancock Chamber of Commerce, members commemorated the founding of the Chamber by the Bay St. Louis Rotary Club in 1925 to a sell-out crowd at Diamondhead Country Club on January 22nd. Mark Henderson of Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company, 2015 Chamber President, passed the gavel to Angelyn Treutel-Zeringue of SouthGroup Insurance-Gulf Coast as 2016 President.

“Our theme this year is ‘believe’!” said Zeringue.

“I believe in Hancock County and the Hancock Chamber and what we can accomplish working together with our elected officials,” said Zeringue. “I invite you to BELIEVE in Hancock County, BECOME involved and BELONG to the Hancock Chamber,” she said.

“Our priorities are to continue our economic development work with the Hancock County Port & Harbor Commission, and continue our work on insurance issues and beautification. We also want to continue our efforts to promote business and to attract more talented people and families to live and work in our county.”

The meeting was kicked off by the St. Rose Gospel Choir, directed by Bailey Hinton. Dr. Cherie Labat of the Bay St. Louis-Waveland School District and chairman of the Hancock Community Development Foundation led the group in the invocation and the choir sang the national anthem. Labat provided information on the 20 community and economic development causes the Foundation supports and announced that 2016 is the 10th Anniversary of the founding of the organization. She also introduced the executive committee of the Foundation: Leslie Henderson of Lazy Magnolia Brewing Company is Vice-Chairman; David Bassett, CPA is Treasurer; Jon Ritten of Coldwell Banker, Coast Delta Realty is Past Chairman; and, Tish Williams is Executive Director/Secretary. Susan Stevens, retired from the health care industry, and Angie Kothmann with South Mississippi Planning and Development District were elected to the board of directors.

Zeringue-chamber

Angelyn Treutel-Zeringue was elected 2016 President of the Hancock Chamber. Cathy Wilson of the Hancock County School District was elected Vice President. Rea Montjoy, CPA of Select Administrative Services is treasurer; and, Trent Favre of Jones Walker is an officer on the executive board. Tish Williams will continue as secretary and executive director. Zeringue, Wilson, Chris Cochran of S&L Office Supplies & Printing, Micah Necaise of The First, A National Banking Association, Janell Nolan of Coast Electric were elected by the membership for a three year term on the Board of Directors. As her first order of business, Zeringue appointed the following members for a one year term on the board of directors: Raymunda Barnes of Pearl River Community College, Matt Crittenden of Crittenden Distillery, Heather Ladner Smith of Butler Snow, LLP and Chuck Underwood of Treasures of the Bay.

Terie Velardi, president of the Bay St. Louis Rotary Club, provided Chamber members a brief history of the founding of the Chamber by the Rotary Club 90 years ago.

“Working together, the Hancock Chamber and Community Development Foundation have secured more than $11 million in state and federal grants for community and economic development programs for Hancock County since the Foundation was founded,” said Tish Williams, executive director of both organizations.

Mayor Tommy Schafer, City of Diamondhead, welcomed the more than 250 members of the Chamber to the City and expressed appreciation for the partnership the city forged with the Chamber this past year to develop a new brand, interactive website and brochure. In the second phase of the new website: www.diamondhead.ms.us, the city site will have a MUNICODE development, an online software service providing residents with easy access to municipal codes and resolutions. Diamondhead will be the only city in the county with this technology. The site will also feature ward and district maps.

The Chamber announced three other partnerships during 2015. The first marketing partnership was with the Hancock County Port & Harbor Commission to build a new brand, website and marketing materials to market the industrial assets of the county.

“If you are not on line with relevant, timely information, you will not be taken seriously as an industrial site,” said Tish Williams, executive director of the Hancock Chamber of Commerce.

Through the vision of the staff and members of the Hancock County Port & Harbor Commission, the county’s industrial assets are online at www.portairspace.com with robust and automated information about Port Bienville Industrial Park, the Stennis International Airport & Airpark, and Stennis Space Center.

The Bay St. Louis Rotary Club founded the Hancock Chamber 90 years ago in 1925. Thanks to a photograph from Pat Murphy, this is a shot of the Chamber’s first office.

The Bay St. Louis Rotary Club founded the Hancock Chamber 90 years ago in 1925. Thanks to a photograph from Pat Murphy, this is a shot of the Chamber’s first office.

The Chamber also launched a new brand and website for Partners for Stennis Space Center at www.partnersforstennis.org. In 2016, the organization is commemorating the 20th anniversary of its founding. The new tagline, advancing business at Stennis Space Center, communicates the organization’s mission of advocating for the technical and academic growth at the center in the defense industry sector. The new site features an interactive membership directory and a new job bank to link employers at Stennis with citizens seeking job opportunities. It also provides relocation resources to attract more people who work at Stennis to live in Hancock County and the two state region.

The Chamber also continued its marketing partnership with INFINITY Science Center. “ Thanks to a $500,000 grant the Chamber secured from the Gulf Seafood and Tourism Promotional fund, a major interstate sign was constructed to drive traffic off of I-10 into Hancock County and INFINITY 24/7,” said Williams.  A billboard campaign will launch in the summer season funded through another grant.

The Chamber continues to offer members the same great marketing services: weekly checklist, email blasts, website advertising, instant news, networking opportunities, and technical assistance through the new partnership with Habitat for Humanity, PRCC and MSU Extension Service.

“Our mission continues to be to provide our members—both individual citizens and businesses— with relevant, value added benefits and programs through superior customer service,” said Williams.

Mark Henderson provided the membership with the annual report and announced that 13 out of 28 economic development initiatives assigned to the Chamber through the Hancock County Economic Development Strategic Plan are either underway or complete.

“It is truly through the work of the Chamber’s 25 volunteer led committees that so much of this is possible to improve quality of life for all of us. To all of our volunteer chairmen and committee members, thank you for your dedication and your passion to make Hancock County a better place to live,” said Henderson.
During the meeting, the Chamber featured the work of the Hancock Chamber Greenways and By-ways committee. “The Clermont Harbor Cleanup project was born out of a plea for help from Millie Usher, former chair of the Clermont Harbor Civic Association, during one of our committee meetings,” said Committee Chair, Allison Anderson of unabridged Architecture. Today, thanks to the support of Mississippi Power and many others, including Tommy Kidd and the new association chair, Craig Clement…more than 5 tons of debris were removed from the Harbor and plans are already underway for a phase II clean-up this spring through the Renew Our Rivers Program.

If you have been considering joining the Hancock Chamber of Commerce as an individual, non-profit or business, go to www.hancockchamber.org or call 228-467-9048 for information on how you can market your business through the Chamber and become involved in the community. The Annual Meeting of the Hancock Chamber was sponsored by: American Medical Response, Coast Electric Power Association, Hancock Bank, Hancock County Port & Harbor Commission, Mississippi Power, The Peoples Bank, and Silver Slipper Casino Hotel.



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